Maggie Pill

The Most Entertaining Cozy Author You Never Heard Of!


Sunday, February 22, 2015

If You Listen to Books:

The second Sleuth Sisters book is now out on audio (at Amazon, Audible, & iTunes).

I'm learning about audio--very slowly. When I originally signed a contract for book #1, THE SLEUTH SISTERS, I pictured CDs I could take to events and sell.
That isn't how it's done, at least not on Audible. It's a download.

Someone suggested that since the books are pretty popular in Michigan, I should let the Library for the Blind know about their availability for audio. I did, but I learned that at least some libraries want/need the CD. Besides, they buy through Overdrive, not Amazon.

So yeah, I'm learning. Still, the first audiobook is doing well, and I just got word that the second is out, at least on Audible. I don't see it on Amazon yet, so keep checking if that's the way you buy.

Now we get to start the whole process over with book #3! Here's a preview of that cover, though I sent in some requests for fine-tuning.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Comments? Suggestions?


There are things to fix. It needs the subtitle: A Sleuth Sisters Mystery, which will probably go in the bushes. It's Murder IN the Boonies, and I want the 2nd & 3rd flowers on the rail, not floating above it. But it's a good start, and I'm interested in your impressions. Pink? Greenish?
BTW, the flowers represent our girls: a rose for Retta, gladiolus for Barb (symbolize integrity) and lavender for Faye (devotion).

Monday, February 16, 2015

It's Always Something

The second Sleuth Sisters really is coming out on audio. It's just taking longer than anyone expected. Our target was January 15, but it's more like February 20-something now. I just okayed it for about the third time, and the delays are probably my fault. Right now it's in review, where Audible checks it to be sure it will download and play, etc., which usually takes a week.

I think in future I should just make the latest date I think is possible for release and add a month to it.


For those past Book #2, Murder in the Boonies, Sleuth Sisters #3, is with the editor and cover designer. I'll give you all a sneak peek at the cover as soon as I get it.


Monday, February 9, 2015

The Cat's Rebuttal

Last week I wrote about dogs and their understanding of words.
My cat was not amused, so here's the low-down on cats, in her own words.







"Of course we understand every word you speak, but you are silly and inconsequential, so we do not deign to respond.

If we wanted to go somewhere in the car, we'd drive ourselves. In fact, we do, at night, when you're asleep. I've been to Detroit twice and Chicago once in the last year.

Less is more to a cat. A tiny bump with my head means more than all the gyrating those dumb dogs do to get your attention, so be grateful.

Oh, and one more thing: When I play, even if I look silly or accidentally fall off the couch in the process, I expect you to keep quiet about it. Is nothing sacred?"

Monday, February 2, 2015

Why You Talk to Your Dog

Not Maggie. Not Maggie's dog. Cool pic, though!
Recently, science has discovered that dogs understand lots more of what's said to them than was previously thought...well, by scientists. Dog owners have long known there's a big vocabulary in those furry little heads.

Your dog might know words like ride or car. He for sure knows treat and walk. Not only does he know words, he senses how much meaning is behind them, especially no. Like a toddler, he learns to judge when you really will get out of that chair and stop him and when you're just too tired or too lazy to follow through.

Even when they don't understand words, dogs sense the emotion behind them. They know when we're sad, when we're excited, and when we need a wet nose shoved into our faces.

So why do we talk to them beyond those few hundred words they know, like ball and fetch? Because dogs are great listeners. Unlike most people, they've got nothing but time for you, and if you want to tell them stuff, they're okay with that. They won't pass it on to other dogs. They won't tell you you should have known better. They won't change the subject. Instead they'll look at you intelligently, let you talk for as long as you need to, and then suggest something that will improve your mood.

No, they can't say "Walk" or "Ride" or "Fetch," but they know those things are good for you. They'll probably act it out until you get it.